El Espacio Sideral

“Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, stands beside the Passive Seismic Experiments Package (PSEP).  The Laser Ranging Retro Reflector (LRRR), U.S. Flag, television camera and the Apollo Lunar Surface Close-up Camera (ALSCC) and LM are visible also. Image taken at Tranquility Base during the Apollo 11 Mission.” 
National Archives Local Identifier: 255-AMP-as11-40-5948

“Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, stands beside the Passive Seismic Experiments Package (PSEP).  The Laser Ranging Retro Reflector (LRRR), U.S. Flag, television camera and the Apollo Lunar Surface Close-up Camera (ALSCC) and LM are visible also. Image taken at Tranquility Base during the Apollo 11 Mission.” 

National Archives Local Identifier: 255-AMP-as11-40-5948

todaysdocument:

The Eagle Has Landed, The Flight of Apollo 11, 1969

Through television, motion picture and still photography, this film provides an “eye-witness” perspective of the Apollo 11 mission that put a human on the moon in July 1969.

Read about the moon landing and all the activity surrounding Apollo’s mission with an article from Prologue’s archives: http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2003/summer/20-july-1969.html


 “Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 Commander inside the Lunar Module (LM) as it rests on the lunar surface after completion of the Extravehicular Activities (EVA).” 
National Archives Local Identifier: 255-AMP-as11-37-5528

 “Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 Commander inside the Lunar Module (LM) as it rests on the lunar surface after completion of the Extravehicular Activities (EVA).” 

National Archives Local Identifier: 255-AMP-as11-37-5528

yknowforkids:

Erwin Schrödinger is known as the father of quantum mechanics— which parts ways with classical mechanics at the atomic and subatomic level. Rather than following the usual (and logical) Newtonian laws, quantum mechanics posits some unique theories—some of which are outlined in these videos.

So, what does this mean to us? Aside from seeking to explain how our world works, quantum mechanics is being used by some individuals looking to create quantum computers. Traditional computing is based upon binary code where bits can be either a 1 or 0. In quantum computing, a Qubit can be a 1 or 0 or 1 and 0 at the same time. If this turns out to be true, then quantum computers can run calculations much faster than traditional computers.

s-c-i-guy:


Perihelion and Aphelion
The closest point to the Sun in a planet’s orbit is called perihelion. The furthest point is called aphelion. Notice how the planet moves fastest at perihelion and slowest at aphelion.
The time during the year that aphelion and perihelion (when we are closet to the sun) changes over a roughly 100,000 year cycle, known as the Milankovitch Cycle.  Our orbit around the sun is not a circle, it is an ellipse with an eccentricity of about 0.0167.  This orbit both changes shape and rotates around the sun much like a spirogram tracing out a flower-like shape.It is summer in the northern hemisphere, a time when people often say things like, “We are closer to the sun than we are in winter.”  This is not really true.  Summer is a product of the angle at which Earth is tilted, right now Earth is tilted so that the northern regions lean toward the sun.  In terms of orbit we are actually at the furthest point Earth gets from the sun.This has interesting implications in terms of the global climate.  This means that right now winters tend to be warm (the planet is closer to the sun) and summers cool (the planet further from the sun).  In the big picture this places us in the midst of a global cool cycle, the type of situation that tends to lead to ice ages, like the one we are emerging from.
source

s-c-i-guy:

Perihelion and Aphelion

The closest point to the Sun in a planet’s orbit is called perihelion. The furthest point is called aphelion. Notice how the planet moves fastest at perihelion and slowest at aphelion.

The time during the year that aphelion and perihelion (when we are closet to the sun) changes over a roughly 100,000 year cycle, known as the Milankovitch Cycle.  Our orbit around the sun is not a circle, it is an ellipse with an eccentricity of about 0.0167.  This orbit both changes shape and rotates around the sun much like a spirogram tracing out a flower-like shape.

It is summer in the northern hemisphere, a time when people often say things like, “We are closer to the sun than we are in winter.”  This is not really true.  Summer is a product of the angle at which Earth is tilted, right now Earth is tilted so that the northern regions lean toward the sun.  In terms of orbit we are actually at the furthest point Earth gets from the sun.

This has interesting implications in terms of the global climate.  This means that right now winters tend to be warm (the planet is closer to the sun) and summers cool (the planet further from the sun).  In the big picture this places us in the midst of a global cool cycle, the type of situation that tends to lead to ice ages, like the one we are emerging from.

source

afro-dominicano:

Earth’s Siblings: Inside The Planets

Click each for a neat and informative view of the neighboring planets in our Solar System.

via SPACE

heythereuniverse:

Meet the electric life forms that live on pure energy | NewScientist

Stick an electrode in the ground, pump electrons down it, and they will come: living cells that eat electricity. We have known bacteria to survive on a variety of energy sources, but none as weird as this. Think of Frankenstein’s monster, brought to life by galvanic energy, except these “electric bacteria” are very real and are popping up all over the place.

Unlike any other living thing on Earth, electric bacteria use energy in its purest form – naked electricity in the shape of electrons harvested from rocks and metals. We already knew about two types, Shewanella and Geobacter. Now, biologists are showing that they can entice many more out of rocks and marine mud by tempting them with a bit of electrical juice. Experiments growing bacteria on battery electrodes demonstrate that these novel, mind-boggling forms of life are essentially eating and excreting electricity.

[Read more]

heythereuniverse:

Rosette Nebula (Caldwell 49) Hubble Palette | Terry Hancock

todaysdocument:

Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin make the first moonwalk, on July 20, 1969.

In these clips they can been seen planting the U.S. Flag on the lunar surface and experimenting with various types of movement in the Moon’s lower gravity, including loping strides and kangaroo hops.

Moonwalk One, ca. 1970

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, 1962 - 1981. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

via Media Matters » Stepping Stones to the Moon

newsweek:

Landing on the moon, July 20, 1969. 

Happy Mooniversary!